The Right to Die With Dignity

My story will not save anyone. My Hope and Story certainly cannot and will not save another person from completing. We’ve tried. We’ve lost too many. That we’re still walking, breathing, bitching and pissed off says it all. We are invincible. With at least ten (10) combined failed attempts, we conclude that we are unkillable. We are immortal.

Assisted Outpatient Treatment = Involuntary Commitment

Assisted Outpatient Treatment Reschackling Road Tripping Back to the Asylum: Restraints On Us All Jennifer Maria Padron[1] and Amanda Barnabe[2] Judi Chamberlin, Confessions of a Non-Compliant Patient “I tried hard to be a good patient. I saw what happened to bad patients: they were the ones in the seclusion rooms, the ones who got sentContinue reading “Assisted Outpatient Treatment = Involuntary Commitment”

Healing Voices Screening | Washington, DC

Feel free to SHARE this information for THIS Friday’s, April 29, 2016 FREE motion picture screening of “healing voices” in Washington, DC. Many thanks to Oryx Cohen, PJ Moynihan and the Healing Voices Team. Daphne Klein and Jen Padron lead the welcome. Debbie Plotnick, Vice-President for Mental Health and Systems Advocacy at Mental Health AmericaContinue reading “Healing Voices Screening | Washington, DC”

The Horror, The Horror

Written by Amanda Barnabe and Jen M. Padron The first line of treatment in US psychiatric care is the prescription of psychotropic medications to an effected individual exhibiting mental diversity symptomology entailing behavioral and/or physical medically descriptive treatment. The symptoms and prescribed diagnosis, according to the Diagnostic Statistical Manual’s (DSM-5, 2016) symptomology of “Serious Mental Illness”Continue reading “The Horror, The Horror”

Asylums? Susan Rogers Speaks.

Dr. Sisti began by insisting that “we do not want to return to those asylums … that are now infamous for incarcerating thousands of Americans … What we were calling for is a rehabilitation of the term ‘asylum’ … [as] a safe sanctuary where they may be able to heal and reclaim their lives in recovery.” Asked about the reason for the widespread use of chemical restraints, Dr. Sisti responded that it is “a lot easier to maintain control and safety in an overcrowded institution when individuals are chemically controlled. We’re seeing this now in prisons,” where individuals with mental health conditions who are often without access to adequate treatment are “oftentimes given large doses of drugs to keep them both safe and comfortable” (emphasis added).