Expert Q & A with Jen Padron and Dr. Nev Jones

“If you want Recovery-based look at time tested work coming out of Boston University, University Pennsylvania, Temple University, Rutgers University, Yale University, the University of Southern California, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the work of Pat Deegan, Mary Ellen Copeland, Steve Harrington, Sheri Mead and Chris Hansen, Dan Fisher, Peggy Swarbrick, Mark Salzer, John Brekke, Laysha Ostrow, Lauren Tenney, Ron Manderscheid and others. It is interesting to me but makes total sense that most, if not all of innovative and emerging work around Recovery, the CPS, Recovery Coach, Community Health Worker Promotora is being developed by peer-led interest groups who are carefully tucked into national oversight behavioral and health leadership organizations (e.g., ACMHA College for Behavioral Health Leadership’s Peer Leadership Interest Group) and initiated MCO Integration initiatives are rolling out (in ’15-’16) an array of CPS service deliverables that will grow a US Peer workforce exceeding the recognized state’s Medicaid Rehabilitation Option billing model (e.g., Psychosocial Rehabilitation, Medications Management, Case Management).”

ACMHA SUMMIT 2015: THE COLLEGE FOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH LEADERSHIP PRESENTS HEALTHY BEHAVIOR, LITERACY AND ACTIVATION – THE GATEWAY TO THE FUTURE OF HEALTH

HOW CAN WE BEND THE HEALTH CARE COST CURVE WHILE INCREASING THE WELLNESS AND RECOVERY OF THOSE WE SERVE? HEATH LITERACY AND ACTIVATION IS ONE PART OF THE ANSWER.

According to Healthy People 2010, an individual is considered to be “health literate” when he or she possesses the skills to understand information and services and use them to make appropriate decisions about health. Lack of health literacy is estimated to cost $106-$236 billion annually. Activation goes beyond seeing a health care provider and understanding how to promote recovery; it’s the art and science of taking action on the information you have been given. It’s doing the things necessary to move toward recovery and wellness.

The 2015 ACHMA Summit explores this topic from several angles. What can we learn from the “physical health” community on this topic? What about technology – is it helping or hurting? How can we take a community approach? What does the research tell us? What does it mean to approach this in a culturally competent or at least sensitive manner? What can we learn from the positive psychology movement?

RECOVERY WORKS: National Activists & Organizations Call for Action

“Recovery is a process, a way of life, an attitude, and a way of approaching the day’s challenges. It is not a perfectly linear process. At times our course is erratic and we falter, slide back, regroup and start again… The need is to meet the challenge of the disability and to re-establish a new and valued sense of integrity and purpose within and beyond the limits of the disability; the aspiration is to live, work and love in a community in which one makes a significant contribution.”
— Pat Deegan, PhD, person in recovery from serious mental illness