US Peer Services | Supports Initiative Fall 2015 – Winter 2016 Coming Soon

It is in my opinion, speaking as a person with shared lived experience and as a Certified Peer Specialist with my fingers in the water of US Peer initiatives, that we’re on an exciting pathway that is entirely Spirit led.

I was recently at AltCon15 in Memphis | Tennessee that Peer Link and MHA of Oregon hosted and brava to the Team!

Dr. Jessica Wolf (Yale University), Erme Mahla (MHASP) and I co-presented Education 2.0! which is a pendium workshop length presentation on the educational opportunities leverageable for CPS, RC and CHW. Nice work together.

I will be providing my collateral knowledge nationally within a sharp broadband environment this Fall 2015 and Winter 2016.

My interest in the US Peer Workforce is simple. It’s about Jobs, stupid. The economy of life and saving lives.

For more information, email me directly at jennifermpadron@gmail.com.

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Expert Q & A with Jen Padron and Dr. Nev Jones

Expert Q & A with Dr. Nev Jones, Stanford University

Expert Q & A with Dr. Nev Jones (Stanford University) in work with NASHMPD:

Jen Padron M.ED, ACPS, CPS, CHW, PhD(c)

Jen Padron is a nationally recognized expert on peer support and peer workforce development and is currently the Principal at Padron & Associates, based in Georgia.  The consultancy are subject matter experts in co-locating Behavioral and Physical public health care environments which directly impact the US Peer Workforce (Certified Peer Specialist Certification).  Before moving to Georgia, as Project Manager to The Hope Concept Wellness Center and Director to The HOPE Project her extensive experience as a recovery consultant and evaluation specialist supported Texas and national mental health transformative initiatives.  Recently, Jen has contracted to provide technical assistance and program development on a Latino/a-focused early intervention in psychosis (EIP) peer support development project based in Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Q:  Given your expertise in peer support and peer workforce development, what do you think current priorities should. be for peer inclusion/support in EIP services?

 Jen Padron:  SAMHSA’s naming the Certified Peer Specialist as a Best Practice of Peer Services and Supports, paired with their recent CPS Core Competencies is fab. In order to be considered an EBP and melded into federal wordspeak, it “normalizes” a US Peer Workforce to grow and rolls-out proven Accountable Care Act public health Integration initiatives via various types of Peer Services | Supports deliverables.  It also means that CLAS must be adhered to. In other words, the CPS must ultimately adhere to National Standards for Culturally Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care.  CLAS addresses and preserves multicultural, linguistic and diversity through inclusive accountability for ethnicity, religion, gender, age, geography and socioeconomic status, language and literacy, sexual identity where “orientation” and gender identity cross a binary continuum.

Q:  Not a lot of work in early intervention has focused on cultural sensitivity or culturally-informed intervention.  Why do you think such work needs to be prioritized?

Jen Padron:  Priority #1. In simple terms, the backstory on Recovery, is still that she is the orphan child of the clinically medical based psychiatric and psychological community globally. More than the majority of early interventions center around people identified as living with a schizophrenia affective disorder. There are numerous longitudinal studies having ease in quantifying where something as “new” as the CPS does not. If you want Recovery-based look at time tested work coming out of Boston University, University Pennsylvania, Temple University, Rutgers University, Yale University, the University of Southern California, the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the work of Pat Deegan, Mary Ellen Copeland, Steve Harrington, Sheri Mead and Chris Hansen, Dan Fisher, Peggy Swarbrick, Mark Salzer, John Brekke, Laysha Ostrow, Lauren Tenney, Ron Manderscheid and others. It is interesting to me but makes total sense that most, if not all of innovative and emerging work around Recovery, the CPS, Recovery Coach, Community Health Worker Promotora is being developed by peer-led interest groups who are carefully tucked into national oversight behavioral and health leadership organizations (e.g., ACMHA College for Behavioral Health Leadership’s Peer Leadership Interest Group) and initiated MCO Integration initiatives are rolling out (in ’15-’16) an array of CPS service deliverables that will grow a US Peer workforce exceeding the recognized state’s Medicaid Rehabilitation Option billing model (e.g., Psychosocial Rehabilitation, Medications Management, Case Management).  As well, the national consumer related TACs, funded by SAMHSA are doing excellent work (e.g., BRSS TACS, Peer Link, MHA National, The National Self-Help Consumer Clearinghouse/MHASP).

Q:  How do you see peers in particular contributing to culturally-informed services, including planning and evaluation?

Jen Padron:  The National Consumer Technical Training and Assistance Centers (TACs) are producing quality and worthwhile mentionable Youth and Peer-Led initiatives regionally and nationally.  For example, the SAMHSA ADS Center work around social inclusion and SAMHSA / CMHS’ campaign on whole health and wellness (e.g., 10X10, National Wellness Week, National Wellness Month, Million Hearts) accomplished much to hallmark leadership in the myriad of regionally and nationally centric communities in multiculturalism, cultural linguistic diversity and stigma reductive measures directing social change efforts (e.g., Gitane Williams, Craig Lewis, Tracy Love, Sharon Cretsinger, Tina Minkowitz, Adam Slosberg, Daphne Klein, Diane Engster, Lauren Tenney, Leah Harris, Amy Smith, et al.). The Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association produced outstanding psychiatric multicultural principles under the direction of Lisa Razzano, Peter Ashenden, and Boston University’s Sargent College.  Gender and women’s studies prevailing thought centers on Hope, WRAP(R), IPS (R), eCPR (R), and the CPS core competencies (SAMHSA, 2015) guarantee a culturally-informed, sustainable community and trauma informed recovery oriented system of care.

 

 

 

 

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White Paper and Teleconference Webinar July 18 REGISTRATION LINK

Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/881761328

This TA-lk Webinar will inform and inspire, and show how to take action. The focus will be improving US peer leadership and US domestic workforce development utilizing Certified Peer Specialists (CPS), Recovery Coaches (RC), and Community Health Worker Promotoras (CHW), together with Licensed Integrated Care Professionals (LICP), in an integrated care environment via the Lived Experience Workforce Development model. It also will increase awareness of current innovative and emergent effective models, programs, initiatives, and services specifically designed for peers, persons in recovery, and those working in integrated care settings (e.g., Health Homes, Person Centered Medical Homes, Federally Qualified Health Centers).

 

Title: TA-lk Webinar: US PEER LEADERSHIP & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
Date: Wednesday, June 18, 2014
Time: 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Pam Hardin Head Shot                                 

Pamela Hardin, MBA, M.Ed, Instructional Designer, State of Texas HHSC; Principal Investigator and Co-Author, “White Paper:  US Peer Leadership and Workforce Development.”

dr john brekke headshot

John Brekke, PhD,Professor,Frances G. Larson Professor of Social Work Research, University of Southern California School of Social Work.

 

 

dr ken minkoff

Ken Minkoff, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard University Medical School; Representataive, BRSS TACS Advisory Council, Representative, American Association of Community      Psychiatrists; Senior Policy Partner, Meadows Mental Health Institute for Texas; Senior System Consultant, ZiaPartners, Inc., San Rafael, California.

 

 

 

OBJECTIVES

  •  Define a policy framework for maximizing access to integrated peer support and recovery support in a recovery oriented integrated system of care.
  •  Describe the pros and cons of various strategies and approaches to expanding peer support and the peer workforce.
  •  Identify the primary reason people with mental illness and/or substance abuse issues die an average of 25 years earlier than the general population.
  •  Identify three peer support entry level paid positions.
  •  Identify who benefits when lived experience and taking personal responsibility for health and wellness are respected instead of stigmatized.

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • US Certified Peer Specialists, Recovery Coaches and Community Health Worker Promotoras;
  • Peers and persons in recovery, current and past recipients of mental health and substance abuse services, and family members;
  • Peer-run and provider organizations;
  • Community- and faith-based organizations that support individuals with mental and substance use disorders;
  • State, county behavioral health departments;
  • Federally Qualified Health Centers and Look-Alikes;
  • Health Homes and Person Centered Medical Homes;
  • Policy makers and decision makers;
  • Integrated behavioral health and physical health care providers.
System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer
Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

 

 

June 18 3:30-4:30 PM EST TA-lk Webinar: US PEER LEADERSHIP & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

WHITE PAPER:  US PEER LEADERSHIP AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Hardin, P., Padron, J., (2014). Ed., Dr. Ron Manderscheid; White Paper: US Peer Leadership & Workforce Development

In economics, the cycle of poverty is the “set of factors or events by which poverty, once started, is likely to continue unless there is outside intervention. Individuals living with mental health, substance abuse and physical health challenges represent a large portion of individuals living in chronic poverty.”

The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the health-activated social movement provide the integrated health community an exceptional opportunity to provide outside intervention.

Creating a peer-based leadership development model provides valued added supports to integrate the strengths of the behavioral health focused Certified Peer Specialists (CPS), substance abuse and addictions centered Recovery Coaches (RC) and physical health education and promotion geared Community Health Worker Promotoras (CHW).  The CPS, RC and CHW to pursue career alongside a Licensed Integrated Care Professional (LICP) (Hardin & Padron, 2014) to mentor, support and manage the peer provider workforce.

The proposed Lived Experience Professional (LEP) certification (Hardin & Padron, 2014) is designed for licensed healthcare professionals who embrace recovery practices, promote strength based, self-directed care, whole health and wellness models of care and are open to identifying as a person with lived experience.

A national Lived Experience Workforce Development Model (Hardin & Padron, 2014) establishes and legitimizes the lived experienced service provider as a healthcare occupation and should be recognized by the United States Department of Labor (DOL) and as a billable healthcare provider category through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and managed care organizations (MCO).

Currently, at the federal and state-by-state level, the CPS, RC and CHW are Medicaid and Managed Care Organization(s) are capable of reimbursement for behavioral and physical integrated systems of care.  The authors propose a triage care model for the combination of peer based supports, substance abuse/addiction and physical health care chronic disease education, promotion and community outreach.

The CPS, RC and CHW work in a peer-led integrated care environment (e.g., health home or PCMH) utilizing a behavioral and primary care health and alternative healing treatment teams steeped in recovery oriented systems of care.  This financially sustainable model allowing for behavioral and physical health reimbursability and fully embedded peer services and supports (CPS, RC and CHW) in Federally Qualified Health Centers, Look-Alikes and a fee for service model leveraging MCOs.

TA-lk Webinar: US PEER LEADERSHIP & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

 This TA-lk Webinar will inform and inspire, and show how to take action. The focus will be improving US peer leadership and US domestic workforce development utilizing Certified Peer Specialists (CPS), Recovery Coaches (RC), and Community Health Worker Promotoras (CHW), together with Licensed Integrated Care Professionals (LICP), in an integrated care environment via the Lived Experience Workforce Development model. It also will increase awareness of current innovative and emergent effective models, programs, initiatives, and services specifically designed for peers, persons in recovery, and those working in integrated care settings (e.g., Health Homes, Person Centered Medical Homes, Federally Qualified Health Centers).

 FEATURED SPEAKERS

 

Pam Hardin Head ShotPamela Hardin, MBA, M.Ed, Instructional Designer, State of Texas HHSC; Principal Investigator and Co-Author, “White Paper:  US Peer Leadership and Workforce Development”

 

 

 

 

 

dr ken minkoffKen Minkoff, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard University Medical School; Representataive, BRSS TACS Advisory Council, Representative, American Association of Community Psychiatrists; Senior Policy Partner, Meadows Mental Health Institute for Texas; Senior System Consultant, ZiaPartners, Inc., San Rafael, California

 

 

 

 

dr john brekke headshot

John Brekke, PhD, Professor,Frances G. Larson Professor of Social Work Research, University of Southern California School of Social Work

 

 

 

 

 

TARGET AUDIENCE

  •  US Certified Peer Specialists, Recovery Coaches and Community Health Worker Promotoras;
  • Peers and persons in recovery, current and past recipients of mental health and substance abuse services, and family members;
  • Peer-run and provider organizations;
  • Community- and faith-based organizations that support individuals with mental and substance use disorders;
  • State, county behavioral health departments;
  • Federally Qualified Health Centers and Look-Alikes;
  • Health Homes and Person Centered Medical Homes;
  • Policy makers and decision makers;
  • Integrated behavioral health and physical health care providers.

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US Peer Leadership & Workforce Development Releases Today

be a voice not an echo

Executive Summary [Excerpt]

The future is here. 2014 is the year of the peer. In economics, the cycle of poverty is the “set of factors or events by which poverty, once started, is likely to continue unless there is outside intervention.” (Wikipedia, 2014)  People with mental health, substance abuse and physical health challenges represent a large portion of individuals living in chronic poverty. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the health activated social movement provide the integrated health community an exceptional opportunity to provide outside intervention.

Workforce Development Plan

Creating a national Lived Experience Workforce Development plan can establish and legitimize the lived experienced service provider as a healthcare occupation and should be recognized by the United States Department of Labor (DOL) as a billable healthcare provider category through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and managed care organizations (MCO). OptumHealth, an innovative MCO, implemented a Peer Services project in New York and Wisconsin both of which are producing remarkable outcomes. The Peer Services preliminary program evaluation results (July 2013) show members who received Peer Services:

  •   Have a Significant Decrease in the number of behavioral health hospital admissionsv  Have a Significant Decrease in the number of behavioral health inpatient days
  •   Have a Significant Increase in outpatient behavioral health visits
  •   Have Significantly Decreased total behavioral health care costs.

An integrated study with funding and support from both the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Institute for Health (NIH) is needed. Health outcome measures should reflect the whole person. Physical and mental health are equally important components contributing to an individual’s quality of life. We need research funded to study the outcomes for both the individual serviced and the peer providing services to legitimize the impact of including and developing this emerging workforce. We need quantifiable evidence from studies examining to what degree implementing a peer workforce career ladder:

  •   Increases access to care
  •   Reduces cost
  •   Improves participant outcomes
  •   Improves provider outcomes

 

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